A little performance and the conference-cat


Workshop organizers Mona Qaiser, Sigrid Peuker, Max Behrendt and a cat about the role of dialogue in citizenship education - and a little performance.

 

Workshop 6 - Stopping racism early on


Europe, we have a problem. Recent studies paint a rather bleak picture of our willingness to deal with immigration in a positive way. Indeed, racist sentiments and hate crimes seem to grow right along with the number of people seeking refuge on our continent. What can we do about this dynamic? What role should citizenship education play in countering it?

You can't have your cake and eat it, too

Workshops, networking and the project market: a look back on friday


So, friday was intense! From opening keynotes and already lively dicsussions in the morning, the project market and a wonderful lunch at midday to the many, many workshops in the afternoon, speakers and participants had a lot of input. Here are some impressions from the day.

 

Workshop 10 | Citizenship education in conflict regions: Challenges, options and dilemmas

 

Workshop 7- From national narratives to shared memories: Is a pan-European memory possible?


Are national narratives still relevant? How are we to think a pan-European memory and how to construct it? What part does the pan-European memory play in citizenship education? Can it help to prevent, manage, solve or even deescalate conflicts? And if so: What would be the framework conditions to ensure that? The workshop provoked a creative and sensible debate among participants and speakers about these core questions of the idea of creating a pan-European memory.

Andrea Mork about the European House of History


Andrea Mork about the idea behind the European House of History in Brussels and how it fits with the notion of a common European framework of remembrance, as suggested by Aleida Assmann

Workshop 11 - Peace education and reconciliation work as twin fields of citizenship education


Conference participants from seven countries and different professional backgrounds joined Ragnar Müller and Borislava Daskalova of DARE (Democracy and Human Rights Education in Europe) for their workshop this afternoon. The attempt to come up with recommendations as a result of the discussion surely showed: There are no easy answers to complicated questions in citizenship education.

We often forget that citizenship educators are citizens, too


Nelly Corbel on the limits to citizen education in times and regions of conflict and the role of transnational help and networking.

 

We don't need a new concept of citizenship education


David Chandler about whether we need a new concept and discourse on power and conflicts in citizenship education and what insights he got from the workshop.

Towards a xenophobic Europe?


Rainer Münz about the causes for the rising xenophobia and what should be the response from politics and citizenship educators.


Workshop 4 - The rise of populism in Europe: What should we know? How should we react?


In recent years, populist and right-wing parties, as well as ultra-conservative and eurosceptic movements, have experienced a massive surge all across Europe. Viktor Orbans Fidesz in Hungary, the Sverigedemokraterna in Sweden, the Front National in France, the Alternative für Deutschland in Germany. How can citizenship education respond to these developments? What causes of populism can we identify in the first place? The workshop with Nick Startin and Ivan Krastnev, hosted by Caroline Hornstein Tomic set out to discuss these questions.

Pages