populism

Workshop 4 - The rise of populism in Europe: What should we know? How should we react?


In recent years, populist and right-wing parties, as well as ultra-conservative and eurosceptic movements, have experienced a massive surge all across Europe. Viktor Orbans Fidesz in Hungary, the Sverigedemokraterna in Sweden, the Front National in France, the Alternative für Deutschland in Germany. How can citizenship education respond to these developments? What causes of populism can we identify in the first place? The workshop with Nick Startin and Ivan Krastnev, hosted by Caroline Hornstein Tomic set out to discuss these questions.

Responses to populism and Euroscepticism


Nicholas Startin on the rise of populism in Europe and the question of how citizenship education should respond to Euroscepticism and populistic currents.

Doing nothing is not an option: Europe needs to get involved!


Jan-Werner Müller on the capacity and responsibility of Europe to assume its position as a relevant international player in tackling the dangers of populism and crises, such as in the Middle East and Ukraine.

 

Wake up, you giant!


Jan-Werner Müller

The end of history will mean the end of great ideologies. This is what Francis Fukuyama proclaimed in his famous essay 'The End of History' after the Fall of the Berlin Wall and the consecutive disintegration of the Soviet Union. However, it would not be a happy end. Instead, it would feel more like a living museum. That Europe has by no means become a museum was the first, but maybe also the last reassuring message of today's first lecture by Jan-Werner Müller.

Different lenses and lessons from the past


Philipp Blom

In today's second keynote Philipp Blom, author, journalist and historian, began by asserting that certainly things have changed for the better in Europe since the end of the Second World War. The question, he asked, is whether they have changed because we actually learned from history.

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