That's all, folks!


So this is it. Three days, eleven workshops, seven keynotes, twelve thousand liters of coffee, tea, wine and beer and roughly fourty-five thousand two hundred and twelve calories later, NECE 2014 is over. It's been fun! Great keynotes, lively debates, a variety of very diverse workshops, a colorful project market and of course: great people. Networking, meeting new friends and seeing familiar faces, above all NECE is about bringing together people from diverse backgrounds in order to share experiences and hands-on reports about the many challenges that citizenship education is facing today and to share the progress that is being made.

The World Café: lessons learned and outlooks from NECE 2014


The 'World Café' at this year's NECE conference was all about reflecting the results and experiences of the workshops and keynotes. For this reason, all of the participants gathered in the foyer, split up in small groups and got down to the business of discussing one of three core quesitons.

NECE has become more focused


Tatjana Meijvogel-Volk of ProDemos about how NECE has changed over the years and why it is still such an important place of encounter.

 

A little performance and the conference-cat


Workshop organizers Mona Qaiser, Sigrid Peuker, Max Behrendt and a cat about the role of dialogue in citizenship education - and a little performance.

 

Workshops, networking and the project market: a look back on friday


So, friday was intense! From opening keynotes and already lively dicsussions in the morning, the project market and a wonderful lunch at midday to the many, many workshops in the afternoon, speakers and participants had a lot of input. Here are some impressions from the day.

 

Workshop 10 | Citizenship education in conflict regions: Challenges, options and dilemmas

 

Workshop 11 - Peace education and reconciliation work as twin fields of citizenship education


Conference participants from seven countries and different professional backgrounds joined Ragnar Müller and Borislava Daskalova of DARE (Democracy and Human Rights Education in Europe) for their workshop this afternoon. The attempt to come up with recommendations as a result of the discussion surely showed: There are no easy answers to complicated questions in citizenship education.

We often forget that citizenship educators are citizens, too


Nelly Corbel on the limits to citizen education in times and regions of conflict and the role of transnational help and networking.

 

We don't need a new concept of citizenship education


David Chandler about whether we need a new concept and discourse on power and conflicts in citizenship education and what insights he got from the workshop.

Towards a xenophobic Europe?


Rainer Münz about the causes for the rising xenophobia and what should be the response from politics and citizenship educators.


Workshop 4 - The rise of populism in Europe: What should we know? How should we react?


In recent years, populist and right-wing parties, as well as ultra-conservative and eurosceptic movements, have experienced a massive surge all across Europe. Viktor Orbans Fidesz in Hungary, the Sverigedemokraterna in Sweden, the Front National in France, the Alternative für Deutschland in Germany. How can citizenship education respond to these developments? What causes of populism can we identify in the first place? The workshop with Nick Startin and Ivan Krastnev, hosted by Caroline Hornstein Tomic set out to discuss these questions.

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