Best of NECE 2014


This year's conference was all about remembrance and taking a look back at - mostly European - history. So let's follow in those footsteps yet again and take a look back: at NECE 2014!

Luuk van Middelaar on legitimacy and soft power


Luuk van Middelaar about why the EU struggles with its legitimacy both within and at its periphery and how citizenship education can contribute to forming a more positive attitude towards Brussels.

Missionaries and monestaries: Europe at a crossroads


The final cornerpiece of this year's NECE conference was marked by Luuk van Middelaar's opening statement on the state of Europe and its capacities of dealing with conflicts, followed by a lively discussion with Philipp Blom and Ivan Krastev.

 

Parallels and paradigms

Workshop 7- From national narratives to shared memories: Is a pan-European memory possible?


Are national narratives still relevant? How are we to think a pan-European memory and how to construct it? What part does the pan-European memory play in citizenship education? Can it help to prevent, manage, solve or even deescalate conflicts? And if so: What would be the framework conditions to ensure that? The workshop provoked a creative and sensible debate among participants and speakers about these core questions of the idea of creating a pan-European memory.

Andrea Mork about the European House of History


Andrea Mork about the idea behind the European House of History in Brussels and how it fits with the notion of a common European framework of remembrance, as suggested by Aleida Assmann

Doing nothing is not an option: Europe needs to get involved!


Jan-Werner Müller on the capacity and responsibility of Europe to assume its position as a relevant international player in tackling the dangers of populism and crises, such as in the Middle East and Ukraine.

 

Wake up, you giant!


Jan-Werner Müller

The end of history will mean the end of great ideologies. This is what Francis Fukuyama proclaimed in his famous essay 'The End of History' after the Fall of the Berlin Wall and the consecutive disintegration of the Soviet Union. However, it would not be a happy end. Instead, it would feel more like a living museum. That Europe has by no means become a museum was the first, but maybe also the last reassuring message of today's first lecture by Jan-Werner Müller.

Different lenses and lessons from the past


Philipp Blom

In today's second keynote Philipp Blom, author, journalist and historian, began by asserting that certainly things have changed for the better in Europe since the end of the Second World War. The question, he asked, is whether they have changed because we actually learned from history.

Common points of reference for a European framework of remembrance


Aleida Assmann, professor at the Universtiy of Konstanz, about different cultures of remembrance, mental maps and the usefulness of a common European framework for remembrance and commemoration.

Do you remember?


In the very first keynote of this year's NECE conference, renowned social scientist and professor at the University of Konstanz, Aleida Assmann, chose to address the issue of a common European culture of remembrance. Taking the year 2014 as her starting point, Assmann began by questioning a common criticism, which holds that commemoration is a rather artificial concept, forced upon a society to serve an, often political, purpose of the present. For being an artificial concept, Assmann argued, the resonance has been "pretty impressive".

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